Comparing 20 vendors in Battery Recycling across 0 criteria.

Market Presence
Contenders Contenders
Market Leaders Market Leaders
Emerging Companies Emerging Companies
Innovators Innovators
Exide Industries
Fortum
GEM
Glencore
Redwood Materials
Umicore
EnerSys
East Penn
Cirba Solutions
CATL
RecycLiCo
Accurec Recycling
Ecobat
Li-Cycle
Neometals
TES
Call2Recycle
Element Resources
ABTC
Doe Run
Product Footprint
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POWERED BY MARKETSANDMARKETS
May 22, 2024
The Full List

The Full List

Company Headquarters Year Founded Holding Type
ABTC Reno, USA 2011 Private
Accurec Recycling Krefeld, Germany 1995 Private
CATL Ningde, China 2011 Public
Call2Recycle Atlanta, USA 1994 Private
Cirba Solutions Charlotte, USA 1991 Private
Doe Run St. Louis, USA 1994 Private
East Penn Lyon Station, USA 1946 Private
Ecobat Dallas, USA 1938 Private
Element Resources Forest City, USA 2020 Private
EnerSys Reading, USA 2000 Public
Exide Industries Kolkata, India 1947 Public
Fortum Espoo, Finland 1998 Private
GEM Shenzhen, China 2001 Public
Glencore Baar, Switzerland 1974 Public
Li-Cycle Toronto, Canada 2016 Public
Neometals West Perth, Australia 2002 Public
RecycLiCo Surrey, Canada 1987 Private
Redwood Materials Carson City, USA 2017 Private
TES Jurong Industrial Estate, Singapore 2005 Private
Umicore Brussels, Belgium 1989 Public
 
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Battery recycling is crucial for several reasons. First, batteries contain various toxic and hazardous materials, including heavy metals such as lead, cadmium, and mercury, which can harm the environment if not properly disposed of. Second, recycling conserves valuable resources like lithium, cobalt, and nickel, reducing the need for new mining. Lastly, it helps decrease energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions associated with the production of new batteries.
Most types of batteries can be recycled. This includes alkaline batteries, rechargeable batteries (nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, and lithium-ion), and lead-acid batteries commonly used in vehicles. Each type of battery undergoes a specific recycling process to recover valuable materials and prevent environmental contamination. It's essential to recycle all battery types responsibly to minimize their impact on the environment and maximize resource conservation.
The recycling process for single-use alkaline batteries involves several steps. First, these batteries are collected and sorted. They are then disassembled, typically using mechanical means, which separates the steel casing, manganese dioxide, and zinc powder components. These materials are then processed and used for various applications, such as producing new batteries or as raw materials for other products. The hazardous materials, like the electrolyte, are neutralized or treated to minimize their environmental impact.
Yes, rechargeable batteries are indeed eligible for recycling. Rechargeable batteries, which include nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd), nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH), and lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries, are highly recyclable. Various collection programs, including those organized by retailers and electronics stores, accept rechargeable batteries. Recycling rechargeable batteries ensures the recovery of valuable materials and the safe disposal of potentially harmful components.
Car batteries, also known as lead-acid batteries, are typically recycled through authorized auto shops, recycling centers, or specialized battery recycling facilities. Many countries and states have regulations in place that require the return of old car batteries when purchasing a new one. This helps ensure proper recycling and the safe handling of lead-acid batteries, which are known for their potential environmental and health risks.
The battery recycling process involves several steps. First, batteries are collected and sorted based on type. Then, they are disassembled, and their components are separated. Valuable materials, such as metals, are recovered and used in the manufacturing of new batteries or other products. Hazardous materials are treated or disposed of in an environmentally responsible manner to minimize their impact on the environment. The specific steps may vary depending on the type of battery and the recycling facility.
When storing used batteries at home before recycling, it's essential to take safety precautions. Store them in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight and heat. To prevent short-circuits, place them in non-conductive containers or cover their terminals with insulating tape. Avoid storing damaged or leaking batteries, as they can be hazardous. Proper storage ensures that the batteries remain safe until you can take them to a recycling center.
Legal regulations related to battery recycling vary by region and country. These regulations are designed to ensure the proper handling, disposal, and recycling of batteries, preventing environmental contamination and health risks. They often address the responsibilities of manufacturers, retailers, and consumers in the battery recycling process. To understand the specific laws in your area, it's advisable to check with local and national authorities or environmental agencies.
While some recycling programs offer incentives or buyback programs for certain types of batteries, most single-use and rechargeable batteries do not provide monetary rewards for recycling. The primary incentive for participating in battery recycling is the contribution to environmental protection and resource conservation. However, it's worth checking local or regional programs, as some areas may offer financial incentives for recycling specific types of batteries, such as lead-acid batteries.
To find a nearby battery recycling center, there are several methods you can use. You can start by using online resources such as websites or search tools provided by organizations like Earth911 or the Call2Recycle program. Additionally, you can inquire with your local government or waste management authorities, as they often maintain information about recycling centers and drop-off locations in your area. Many retailers, especially electronics and hardware stores, also participate in battery recycling programs and may serve as convenient drop-off points.
 
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