Comparing 23 vendors in Immersion Cooling Fluids across 62 criteria.

Market Presence
Contenders Contenders
Market Leaders Market Leaders
Emerging Companies Emerging Companies
Innovators Innovators
Ergon
Apar
Fuchs
Honeywell
Lanxess
Shell
M&I Materials
Fluorez Technology
Nynas
Sinopec
TotalEnergies
Cargill
Castrol
GRC
Lubrizol
Solvay
PetroChina
Submer
Engineered Fluids
Capchem Technology
Zhejiang Noah Fluorochemical
Dober
Chemours
Product Footprint
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POWERED BY MARKETSANDMARKETS
Mar 02, 2024
The Full List

The Full List

Company Headquarters Year Founded Holding Type
Apar Mumbai, India 1958 Public
Capchem Technology Sanming, China 2007 Private
Cargill Wayzata, USA 1865 Private
Castrol Pangbourne, UK 1979 Public
Chemours Wilmington, USA 2015 Public
Dober Illinois, USA 1957 Private
Engineered Fluids Tyler, USA 2017 Private
Ergon Flowood, USA 1954 Private
Fluorez Technology Taipei, Taiwan 2005 Private
Fuchs Mannheim, Germany 1931 Public
GRC Austin, USA 2009 Private
Honeywell Charlotte, USA 1906 Public
Lanxess Cologne, Germany 2004 Public
Lubrizol Wickliffe, USA 1928 Public
M&I Materials New Delhi, India  1993 Private
Nynas Stockholm, Sweden 1928 Private
PetroChina Beijing, China 1999 Public
Shell London, UK 1907 Public
Sinopec Beijing, China 2000 Public
Solvay Brussels, Belgium 1863 Public
Submer Barcelona, Spain 2015 Private
TotalEnergies Courbevoie, France 1924 Public
Zhejiang Noah Fluorochemical Zhejiang Province, China 2015 Private
 
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Immersion cooling fluid is a type of liquid coolant that is used to dissipate heat generated by electronic components in immersion cooling systems. The coolant is a non-conductive liquid, usually oil or synthetic fluid, in which the electronic components are completely or partially submerged. To ensure efficient heat transfer and prevent damage to electronic components, the immersion cooling fluid must have specific properties such as high thermal conductivity, low viscosity, and low evaporation rate. Immersion cooling technology is gaining popularity in high-performance computing applications because it improves energy efficiency and allows for more computing power to be packed into a smaller space.
Immersion cooling works by immersing electronic components in a non-conductive liquid coolant that absorbs heat generated by conduction. The coolant has a higher boiling point than water, allowing it to remain liquid at high temperatures. The coolant flows over the surface of the components, absorbing and dissipating heat. The heated coolant is then routed to a cooling system, such as a heat exchanger or radiator, to cool before being recirculated. Immersion cooling technology has several advantages over traditional air cooling, including higher energy efficiency, lower noise, and higher reliability, particularly in high-performance computing applications.
Immersion cooling has a few advantages over the traditional way of cooling electronic parts with air. First, it makes heat transfer more efficient because liquids are better at carrying heat than air. This means that operating temperatures are lower, performance is higher, and less energy is used. Second, immersion cooling is better at cutting down on noise because it doesn't need moving parts or fans to cool the parts. Immersion cooling can also save money on maintenance costs because there are fewer parts to replace and dust and other contaminants can't get into the parts. Lastly, immersion cooling technology lets hardware be set up in a more compact and dense way, so it can do more computing in a smaller space.
Immersion cooling fluids come in many different kinds, such as: 1. Mineral oil : It is a non-conductive and non-flammable oil that is often used as a coolant for immersion. It is also easy to get and doesn't cost much. 2. Synthetic dielectric fluids: These fluids are made to cool down electronics, and they are often used in high-performance computing. They have a higher boiling point than mineral oil and can handle heat better. 3. Engineered fluids: They are special cooling fluids for immersion that are made for specific uses. Some engineered fluids are made to work best at high temperatures, while others are made to break down naturally. 4. Fluorocarbon-based fluids: They are a type of synthetic dielectric fluid that has good chemical stability, isn't toxic, and doesn't catch fire easily. The choice of immersion cooling fluid will depend on a number of things, like the application, the cooling performance needed, and how well it works with the electronic parts.
Immersion cooling is usually safe for electronics, as long as the right steps are taken. Immersion cooling systems usually use a coolant that doesn't conduct electricity. This means that the coolant won't cause electrical shorts or damage to electronic parts. But it's important to make sure the electronic parts are completely dry before turning them on, because any remaining water can cause electrical shorts or damage the parts. It is also important to keep the coolant at the right level and temperature and to make sure that the system is properly sealed so that there are no leaks. Immersion cooling is a safe and effective way to cool electronic parts as long as the right safety precautions and maintenance steps are taken.
Choosing the right immersion cooling fluid depends on a number of things, such as its thermal conductivity, viscosity, rate of evaporation, compatibility, cost, and impact on the environment. The fluid should have a high thermal conductivity so it can move heat well, and its viscosity should be low enough so it can flow easily over the parts. The rate of evaporation should be low to stop coolant loss and the need for maintenance. To avoid damage or degradation, it is important that the materials and electronic parts work well together. Cost and availability should also be thought about, as well as things like biodegradability and toxicity that have to do with the environment. Talking to experts or manufacturers can help you figure out which immersion cooling fluid is best for a certain job.
The type of fluid used, the operating temperature, and the maintenance schedule all affect how often the immersion cooling fluid needs to be changed. Immersion cooling fluids can usually last for a few years, and some synthetic fluids can last up to 10 years before they need to be changed. But over time, dust, debris, and other impurities can get into the coolant, making it less effective and possibly causing damage to the electronic parts. Because of this, it is best to keep an eye on the fluid and change it when needed. How often you should change the immersion cooling fluid depends on the system and what the manufacturer suggests. In some cases, the fluid may need to be changed every year, while in others, the time between changes may be able to be spread out over several years. It is best to follow the instructions from the manufacturer and talk to experts to figure out how often to change the fluid.
Yes, high-performance computing (HPC) applications can use immersion cooling. Immersion cooling is becoming more and more popular as a way to solve HPC problems because it has many advantages over traditional air cooling. Immersion cooling can help manage heat better, use energy more efficiently, and pack more components into a given space. This can lead to better performance and lower operational costs. Immersion cooling also gets rid of the need for fans and air conditioning, so it can make HPC systems much quieter and leave less of a carbon footprint. Immersion cooling is a promising technology that could change the way we cool electronic parts and servers, especially in high-performance computing.
Immersion cooling has a number of environmental advantages, including: 1. Reduced energy consumption: By eliminating the need for fans and air conditioning, immersion cooling can significantly reduce the energy consumption of electronic components and servers. This can lead to lower electric bills and a lower carbon footprint. 2. Higher energy efficiency: When compared to traditional air cooling methods, immersion cooling can provide better thermal management and cooling performance. This allows electronic components to operate at higher temperatures, potentially improving energy efficiency. 3. Reduced greenhouse gas emissions: Immersion cooling can help to reduce the carbon footprint of electronic components and servers by lowering energy consumption and increasing energy efficiency. This can help to reduce the environmental impact of greenhouse gas emissions. 4. Reduced noise pollution: Because immersion cooling does not require fans, it can significantly reduce the noise produced by electronic components and servers. Employees in data centres and other environments where electronic components are used may benefit from this. Overall, immersion cooling is a promising technology that can help to reduce the environmental impact of electronic components and servers, particularly in high-performance computing applications.
While immersion cooling has several advantages, there are some drawbacks to using this technology, which include: Due to the need for specialised equipment and expertise, the initial cost of implementing an immersion cooling system may be higher than that of traditional air cooling systems. Design complexity: Immersion cooling systems are more difficult to design and implement than traditional air cooling systems because they require specialised equipment and infrastructure. Fluid compatibility: To ensure that immersion cooling fluids do not damage electronic components, fluid compatibility must be carefully considered. Fluid maintenance: Immersion cooling systems necessitate routine maintenance such as fluid replacement and cleaning, which can be time-consuming and expensive. Working with large amounts of dielectric fluid can pose safety risks if proper precautions are not taken. Industry standards are limited: Because immersion cooling is a new technology, there are currently no widely accepted industry standards for immersion cooling systems. Despite these challenges, immersion cooling is becoming more popular in a variety of industries due to its numerous advantages, particularly in high-performance computing applications where efficient thermal management is critical.
 
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